PLENARY SPEAKERS


WEDNESDAY, MAY 30
Roberto Rocha

BIO

Roberto Rocha is a digital journalist and educator who specializes in data-driven reporting and storytelling. Mr. Rocha has worked with CBC Montreal since 2015, and formerly the Montreal Gazette from 2005 to 2015. He is a former lecturer of Advanced Digital Journalism at the University of Ottawa. More information can be found on Mr. Rocha’s website: http://robertorocha.info/

ABSTRACT

Data journalism is the marriage of social science and public-interest storytelling, using data as a source and employing reproducible analysis methods to arrive at a conclusion. This is a radical change from traditional ways of reporting, which often rely on anecdotes and paper documents. But despite being at its heart journalism, where crafting a gripping narrative is just as important as getting the facts right, data journalists haven’t always been good at telling stories. This is changing, and we’re entering a golden age of storytelling based on data and stats.
 

THURSDAY, MAY 31
Dr. Stephanie Pyne

BIO

Dr. Stephanie Pyne is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Carleton Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre. A multidisciplinary researcher with policy experience working with the Justice Department, Dr. Pyne’s PhD work involved creating a cybercartographic atlas intended to shed light on the many dimensions of treaty relationships, including those under the Robinson Huron Treaty. In her current Post-Doctoral research assignment under the Residential Schools Land Memory Mapping Project (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Insight Grant, 2015-2020, PI, Dr. D.R. Fraser Taylor), she works with others in the Residential Schools reconciliation research and education community to expand the work undertaken in her doctoral and post-doctoral studies.

ABSTRACT

Cybercartography and Inclusion: The Residential Schools Land Memory Mapping Project

Providing an inclusive space for many perspectives and encouraging people to express themselves in their own ways is a key ingredient of the kind of deliberative democracy envisioned in Inclusion and Democracy by Iris Marion Young, who recommended a broad approach to rationality that can accommodate alternative forms of communication such as greeting, rhetoric, and narrative. Inclusion is also central to the critical cartographic view of the map as both a process and a narrative vehicle capable of reflecting multiple dimensions. The critical turn in cartography has led to a vast new range of possibilities for mediating reconciliation and social justice initiatives worldwide. Cybercartography is an evolving theoretical and practical framework for transdisciplinary collaborative projects to develop online interactive multimedia atlas websites intended to present multiple perspectives and dimensions of socioeconomic, political and cultural issues. Research began in 2007 on the prototype Cybercartographic Atlas of Indigenous Perspectives and Knowledge (Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region), which provided the basis for the five-year SSHRC-funded Lake Huron Treaty Atlas Project (2009-2014), and in turn led to the current five-year SSHRC-funded Residential Schools Land Memory Mapping Project (RSLMMP, 2015-2020). This discussion tracks the evolution of the RSLMMP with a focus on inclusivity, emergence and the transdisciplinary research relationships that have developed through this evolution.